Posts Tagged ‘Catching Fire’

Irony of situation.

Catching Fire, the sequel of the highly-acclaimed Hunger Games movie based off Suzanne Collins’s best-selling series, is now the top movie in America. Nearly all my friends have seen it. Have I seen it yet? No. Do I want to? Most definitely, yes. What do my parents think of it? They don’t like it. “Too violent.” “A very violent concept for teens to be watching.” “Disturbing.”

Now, check this. Ever since I was seven or eight, I’d been watching boxing. World welterweight champion, Manny Pacquiao, has been fighting for what seems like forever. His fights are on the top Pay-Per-View. My family always has parties and get-togethers with family and friends to watch Pacquiao fight his opponent. We cheer even more if it’s a KO. My parents love it. They’ve even watched classic boxers such as Muhammad Ali fight back in the day. Hundreds of dollars over the years, spent watching boxing. We eat. We scream. We have fun.

See what I’m getting to?

We crave for violence. Whether we like it or not, we are hungry, crazy people who long for bloodshed.

I’m not saying that everyone loves violence. Or that violence is good. I’m saying that we are at least curious about it. We crave it. Somehow, in the deep parts of us, there is a dark side that wants to see some action, some blood.

But is it profitable? Healthy, even?

Well… not really.

Studies show that those who listen to music with lyrics involving violence or have violent tones, tend to become violent. This, I believe, is very true because I notice it with myself too. When I listen to my favorite metal bands, I tend to snap more easily at my family members. It’s kinda scary.

The bottom line that I’m getting to here is that we can’t be blinded by violence. Is it bad to watch Catching Fire or boxing matches? No. But we shouldn’t be addicted to it or else eventually we will be building up with so much violence surrounding us that it will become difficult not to become violent ourselves.

So, I leave with this: Violence in media is not altogether evil, but the love of violence is what makes it evil.

Side note: My thoughts were all over the place writing this. I hope I got my points across.